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Crazy (Willie Nelson)

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Crazy is a balladwritten by Willie Nelson . The song is by multiple artists on the plate, but the most famous version is that of Patsy Cline, out there in 1962 a second place in the country charts with it holds. [1]

Since then by many artists made a cover version , in different music genres. Nelson's own version appeared on his debut album ...And Then I Wrote.

ContentEdit

[hide]*the number 1

The number[Edit]Edit

Willie Nelson wrote the song in early 1961 with the help of his friend Oliver English. Nelson had already written several hits for other artists, but had itself no significant yet recorded. He wrote the song originally for Billy Walker, who thanked for the honor, however, because it would be a ' girls ' song. [2the ultimate success of the song made it possible also for Nelson as a performing artist to break through.

The number describes how the singer, surprised at himself and against my better judgement, of a lost love continues to hold. The number often seen is a cross between a popballad and a jazz with influences fromcountry music.

Patsy Cline[Edit]Edit

Patsy Cline, already a star in the countrywereld, used the song as a successor of her previous big hit I Fall to Pieces. The complex melody of Crazy and Clines vocal talents to complement each other turned out to be fine. The song was released at the end of 1961 and became an instant hit. The song was 21 weeks in the charts and became one of Clines recognition melodies. Clines implementation is on the 85th place ofThe 500 Greatest Songs of All Time by Rolling Stone. [3]

According to the written by Ellis Nassour biography Patsy Cline was Nelson, at that time under the name Hugh Nelson, a songwriter who struggled to keep their heads above water. He came regularly with his friendsKris Kristofferson and Roger Miller, then likewise unknown songwriters, in the Tootsie's Orchid Lounge in Nashville. One evening he walked Charlie Dick, the husband of Patsy Cline, and a recording of him Crazybroke down in the stomach. Dick took the recording home, where he was for his wife. Who found it at first but nothing since Nelson the text is not in the same rhythm as the music "uttered". An irritated Cline noted that they "not that way could sing".

Owen Bradly, Clines producer, however, was away from the number and put it into the ballad which later would be included. On the album I Remember Patsy of Loretta Lynn makes Bradly mention the fact that Patsy, recovering from a near-fatal traffic accident, initially had trouble to get the high notes because of her broken ribs. After four hours in vain try (at a time when there were sometimes recorded four songs in three hours) they decided to stop. Cline came back a week later and recorded the song at once.

In the same interview remembers the first time that Lynn Cline on crutches at the Grand Ole Opry and received three standing ovations. Barbara Mandrell remembers Cline introduced the song at gigs as follows:

All my recent hits have come true in my life. I had a hit out called Tra-La-La Triangle and people thought about me and Gerald and Charlie. I had another hit out called "I Fall to Pieces ' and I was in a car wreck. Now I'm really worried because I have a new hit single out and its called ' Crazy '. (translated: all my recent hits become his truth. I had a hit with the name ' Triangle ' Tra-La-La and people linked me to Gerald and Charlie. Another hit was called ' I Fall to Pieces ' and I got into a car accident right. Now I'm really worried, because I have a new hit and which is called ' Crazy '.)

Willie Nelson gave in the 1993 documentary Remembering Patsy to of played songs all written by him and by others, Clines version of Crazy was his favorite since the ' magical ' was.

Charts[Edit]Edit

Chart (1961) Top Position
U.S. Billboard Hot Country Singles 2
U.S. Billboard Easy Listening 2
U.S. Billboard Hot 100 9
U.K. Singles Chart (reissue 1990) 14
Irish Singles Chart (reissue 1990) 14
Australian Kent Music Report 56

LeAnn Rimes[Edit]Edit

Crazy
Single from:

LeAnn Rimes

From the album:

LeAnn Rimes

(Cover on en.wikipedia.org)
B-side (s) How Do I Live?

Blue

Released 28 december 1999
Type of carrier cd singledigital
Genre country music
Duration 02: 54
Tag Curb
Writer (s) Willie Nelson
Producer (s) Wilbur Rimes
LeAnn Rimes
The Cattle Call Crazy I Need You
Portal  [1]   Music

Country singer LeAnn Rimes took Crazy on for her 1999 album LeAnn Rimes. It was released as the second and last single for this album. On the single were furtherHow Do I Live and Blue.

Rimes also performed the number brought in the White House for George and Laura Bush(especially), which indicated that this was one of her favorite songs.

Chart[Edit]Edit

Chart (1999) Top Position
UK Singles (The Official Charts Company)[4] 36

Other versions[Edit]Edit

On the list of artists who have included Crazy are among others The KillsLinda Ronstadt (6th place in the US), Julio Iglesias (hit in the Netherlands, Great Britain and New Zealand), Kenny Rogers,[5Dottie WestKidneythievesShirley BasseyChaka KhanDon McLeanThe Waifs and Colleen Peterson.

Willie Nelson has recorded the song in several versions, including in a trio with Elvis Costello and Diana Krall. In 1980, Crazy sung by Beverly D'Angelo in the movie Coal Miner's Daughter, about the life of Loretta Lynn, played the role of Patsy Cline. Kidneythieves 1998 version appears on the soundtrack of Bride of Chucky from the same year.

In the media[Edit]Edit

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