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Steve Wright(disc jockey)

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Stephen Richard (Steve) Wright (born on 26 August 1954 in GreenwichLondon) is a disc jockey in the United Kingdom. He became known in the 1980s as a DJ on BBC Radio 1.

ContentEdit

[hide]*1 early life

Young years[Edit]Edit

Wright began in the 1970s on the local Radio station Radio 210 in Reading, just as his later Radio 1 colleague Mike Read. In 1979 he moved to Radio Luxembourg, and in 1980 to BBC Radio 1, where he presented the Saturday night entertainment program. Then he moved to the Saturday morning, and in 1981 to the afternoon program on work days, Steve Wright in the Afternoon. Wright also presented the Sunday morning program from 1984 on this station, Steve Wright on Sunday, while the Friday afternoon program,. Steve Wright on Sundaystopped In 1986, Steve Wright in the Afternoon and returned back on Friday.

Present To Style[Edit]Edit

Steve Wright inaugurated the so-called zoo format, with "so called" guest appearances, crazy sketches, and a so-called posse (his staff, first under the name The Afternoon Boys) who commented and otherwise with their sounds filled the program. He received his inspiration mainly from the United States, where Rick Dees and Wolfman Jack made furore as disk jockeys. The most famous were Wright's "so-called" customers who called him; These characters (sometimes parodies of real celebrities such as Mick Jagger and Arnold Schwarzenegger) were played by Gavin McCoyPeter Dickson and Richard Easter. Wright created several characters and hilarious stories, which also resulted in recordings, including the Schwarzenegger-persiflage "I'll Be Back", released under the name "Eva & The Terminators", that even became a hit.

Wrights lighthearted style of presentation shot the group The Smiths down the wrong way, when he immediately after a news story about the Chernobyl nuclear disaster in 1986 the airy number I'm Your Man byWham! turned. To this end, the group released the song Panic from the text, with The music that they constantly play/It says nothing to me about my life ("the music that they constantly turning/it tells me nothing about my life"), and the chorus Hang the DJ.

Wright got the scorn of the dance scene in 1990 over himself when he took the plate of the eponymous group LFO LFO had to run, which was in the UK singles chart. He had sculpted the number halfway off with the announcement that it really was the worst song he had ever heard. He refused to set up one more time after the number.

Later career[Edit]Edit

Wright moved to the Radio 1 breakfast show in 1994, but resigned in 1995, after the new channel Coordinator Matthew Bannister had turned off a new policy; other disk jockeys from the station, which could find themselves not in here, served their resignation. Wright then switched to a new commercial station, Talk Radio, where he accounted for the Saturday morning program, but returned to the BBC in 1996, where he onBBC Radio 2 Steve Wright's Saturday Show the programs and Steve Wright's Sunday Love Songs present went. In 1999, Wright the afternoon program on weekdays on Radio 2 over, and also presented a show on the BBC television retropop, Top of the Pops 2, until this was stopped.

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